Shangri-La Vegetarian (San Francisco, CA)

A pot of herbal Alternifolia Tea and plate of pickles arrive without notice—a fading hospitality in today’s nickle and dime culture. In the traditional Chinese-style, cabbage and carrots are quick-pickled in salt and then bathed in a sweet vinegar brine. The portion is just enough to wash away the muck of morning and rouse salivation.

This starts every meal at Shangri-La Vegetarian.  A throw back to an era only moments ago in San Francisco’s history. The 1978 Chinese vegetarian outpost sits towards the Pacific edge of the city among bustle of lives of everyday San Francisco families. Here food is served without the surcharge of post-Silicon Valley “progress.”

Thick skins encase the 6. Fried Dumplings ($4.95). The Guo Tie style crescents—popular in Taipei, Taiwan where owner William Sung hails from—offers golden fried butts supporting pleated walls of steamed dough. Pierce the skin and a confetti of minced glass noodles and vegetables spills out.

Bulbs of bok choy scallop the edge of the 51. Sweet and Sour Spare Ribs ($8.50). The center pools with soy chunks glistening in a sweet, corn starch thick, gravy. Served with a bowl of multigrain rice over a glass top table littered with awards and kosher certifications.

Shangri-La Vegetarian
2026 Irving Street
San Francisco, CA 94122

shangrilavegetarian.com

Facebook: @Shangri-La-Chinese-Vegetarian-Restaurant 

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Vegan Friendly: Comfort Food and Sustainability at Donna Jean in Banker’s Hill

The Short and Skinny

Donna Jean offers a vegetable forward menu with midwestern charm and California sensibilities.

 

The Vibe

Under the dappling of the summer sun, pink radish bulbs push through the dirt under the kale leaves and carrot tops surrounding Donna Jean’s patio. Between the magenta shocks of bougainvilleas, tables fill with dukkah-dusted turnips and pizzas dotted with smoked dates and pickled shallots.

Vegetables drive the menu—but all dishes are quietly supported by the spice and experience.

A midwestern boy at heart, Chef Roy Elam carries the lessons learned there—use everything, force nothing.

 

Read more at: http://ediblesandiego.ediblecommunities.com/eat/vegan-friendly-comfort-food-and-sustainability-donna-jean-bankers-hill

Vegan Night 5: The Kamayan Experience

The scent of banana leaves filled the dining room of Trade Winds Tavern. We waited, sipping on wine and kombucha, for the orchestrated meal to begin. A parade moved through the dining room laying serpentine fistfuls of rice between each group as Coconut Mushroom Sisig—a chopped stew spiked with chilies and acid—and Vegan Adobo “Chicken”—proteins traditionally slow cooked in vinegar and spices—were ladled before us. Chopsticks gently tipped the display with shaved chilies (which I ate all of) while a large mound of Bicol Express—a coconut chili “pork” —reached for me as I reached for it.

A plump Pulled Jackfruit Siopao—a tender steamed bun—arrived and we dug in, fingers first, with marked caution that quickly turns into confidence.

The kamayan experience was new to me. A communal feast rooted in Filipino culture which was tolerated under Spanish colonization but then nearly erased when American brought their pearl clenching etiquette* to the island at the end of the Spanish-American War (1898 Treaty of Paris). Through these outside forces weaponized the spoon and fork, the rural family tradition of shared food eaten with the hands persists—which Michael and Noelle, aka @vegainzcouple, shared with the San Diego vegan and vegan-curious community on Saturday July 21, 2018.

Digging into the stews with unprotected digits proved easier—and frankly, funner—then expected. It assumes a level of trust between diners, a forced intimacy that is rare within American’s Protestant tendencies. Kamayan also forces the attention up, between people, as diners don’t dare risk getting Sisig covered fingerprints all over their smart phones.

At the end, small cups of fluffy Halo Halo—Filipino-style shaved ice—appeared floating with bits of sweet bean, jellies, and puffed rice, finishing off a highlight meal of this pop-up series and bringing a communal civility to the states.

Trade Winds Tavern
7767 Balboa Avenue
San Diego, CA 92111
instagram.com/tradewindstavern

Monthly Vegan Night Pop-Up Series:
vegannightsd.com

*This is ridiculous example of the American kettle calling the Filipino pot black. So many classic American dishes, of this and future eras, are eaten by hand. In the late 1800’s Americans where finger fooding toast, corn cob, BBQ, hush puppies, cookies…

Vegan Friendly: Harvest By The Patio in Downtown San Diego

The Short and Skinny

In the shadow of the hot dogs and beer of Petco Park sits stylish, vegetable-forward Harvest by The Patio.

The Vibe

Tucked into the former Carnation Dairy Building, the walls of the first floor are lined with cold cases stacked with grab-and-go meals. The plastic clamshells beckon to game goers (you can bring your own food into the ballpark), while wooden stairs lead dine-in customers to the restaurant’s full-service bar and lounge.

Floor to ceiling images of rolling fields of wind swept wheat face the white subways tiles of the beer tap wall. The airy bar anchors the room with open wire shelving twinkling with an array of bottles.

Read more: http://ediblesandiego.ediblecommunities.com/eat/vegan-friendly-harvest-patio-downtown-san-diego

Vegan Friendly: Blissful Gatherings Monthly Vegan Pop-Up

The Short and Skinny

Each month, plant-based diners gather in the hills of southern San Diego for a stylish, intimate backyard dinner party.

The Vibe

Guests slowly meander along a path winding between Chula Vista homes in order to find the affair, taking in the falling light of dusk.

They know they have arrived when they spot the artfully set table and are approached by staff offering Sol-ti juice and Kombucha, often including Boochcraft, a high alcohol kombucha brewed just a few miles west.

A spray of eucalyptus leaves run along the center of the communal table, while floral vignettes from local growers rise from small globe vases, set mindfully so as to not block plate space or lines of sight.

Read morehttp://ediblesandiego.ediblecommunities.com/eat/vegan-friendly-blissful-gatherings-monthly-vegan-pop

Vegan Friendly: Bar Snacks at Madison on Park

The Short and Skinny

This hip space, which undulates between indoor and out, is known for creative cocktails, but they also have some seriously great vegan options.

The Vibe

The soft blue paint of the simple façade blends into the clear skies above. Window frames popped up like visors offer glimpses of the wood-rich interior. Cedar planked walls are accented by geometric pops of blue, mustard yellow, and soft pink and modern fixtures resemble drops of white glass clenched in brass. Unseen from the street is the modern basilica of a dining room—a breezy semi-outdoor space enveloped by a 20-foot high arch.

Read more athttp://ediblesandiego.ediblecommunities.com/eat/vegan-friendly-bar-snacks-madison-park

Vegan Friendly: BESHOCK Ramen & Sake Bar in San Diego’s East Village

The Short and Skinny

Quivering curls of springy ramen noodles bathed in a creamy vegan both and inventive vegan buns await under the hospitable gaze of the East Village’s BESHOCK Ramen & Sake Bar.

The Vibe

Sunlight streams through the floor to ceiling glass walls into the modern interior of BESHOCK Ramen & Sake Bar. Stamped tin tiles and Gaslamp-style pendants line the far wall, reflecting the historic core of the city. Above a matte black counter, large windows provide an open view into the kitchen where steaming curls of noodles slip into deep bath of carefully crafted broths. Rustic wood tables and steel-backed chairs are set under an industrial steel rack neatly lined with sake bottles.

Owner Ayaka Ito, a certified sake master, opened BESHOCK in 2016, but the journey to get into this space was a long and winding one.

Ito spent nearly three years traveling thought over 100 ramen houses in Japan to learn the craft. Though her eyes were always focused on San Diego, she built her first ramen house—Three Little Pigs—in her hometown of Nagoya, Japan, a sister ramen shop—or “ramen lab” as Ito calls it—where she developed the recipes that would become the cornerstones of her East Village restaurant.

Read more athttp://ediblesandiego.ediblecommunities.com/eat/vegan-friendly-beshock-ramen-sake-bar-san-diegos-east-village

Loving Hut Mira Mesa (San Diego, CA)

 

Delving into new-to-me dishes at Loving Hut Mira Mesa, I was sure to order a known ally: Amazing Chow ($10). Toothsome wheat noodles, echoing the Chinese egg version, twist around charred soy protein and vegetables. The sauce, sweet and one dimensional, caramelized like soy-candy on the seared edges of everything. Overflowing from the plate, this ample dish makes a meal for days to come. 

A wreath of rice paper wrapped around thin rice vermicelli noodles with mint, fried tofu, soy ham, and lettuce fill the plate of the Loving Hut Fresh Roll ($6). Offered with a fragrant pineapple peanut sauce tying together these mild elements at the start of the meal.

Tight buds of brown rice glazed in their own starch, spiked with curry powder, build the base of the Guru Fried Rice ($10).  Strewn with carrot cubes, petite peas, slivered green onion, and haphazardly cut fried tofu, this dishes holds all the notes of a typical Thai style fried rice.

Although I think the portion runs small, the BBQ Noodles ($10) hits all my wants: Cool knots of rice noodles, crispy spring roll, crisp cucumber, herbaceous mint, sharp green onion, mild and sweet soy beef, and dusting of roasted peanuts. Doused in a sweetly diluted soy sauce, this Vietnamese bun-style dish is a little kitchen sampler.

“Amazing Sauce” perseveres through the menu. The sticky sweet brown sauce pours over the Amazing Saute ($12). Similar to the chow but with rice instead of noodles and larger cuts of soy protein.

But, apparently the dish to get here are the Texas Fries ($8.50). According to the internet, Texas Fries are a thing that people who eat at places like Chili’s know and love. Traditionally, sour cream *could* be an ingredient—but more often it’s a cheese slick punctuated with bacon. At Loving Hut Mira Mesa the fries are tossed with raw white onions, scallions, a scant offering of jalapenos, spice powder, and a minuscule sprinkling of vegan cheddar under a huge glob of what the kitchen calls “sour cream.”

It’s a looming—and sometimes legal—question about how we apply words heavily associated with animal products to their vegan alternatives. So while I personally cannot tell anyone what is or isn’t vegan sour creme—to my taste, this is mayo. I’ll do the glob the service of calling it aioli… and aioli and fries…. do you see where I’m going here? These are really pommes frites. Modeled after a beloved world dish, it’s no surprise this is THE menu favorite… despite it’s mistitlement.

Loving Hut Mira Mesa
9928 Mira Mesa Blvd.
San Diego, CA 92131

lovinghut.us/sandiego2

Vegan Friendly: FaVe Tacos in Hillcrest and North Park

The Short and Skinny

Sustainable, farm-savvy T. Elizabeth Cramer fills house-made tortillas with fresh produce pulled fresh from the earth for vegan friendly tacos worth the queue at the Hillcrest and North Park farmers markets.

The Vibe

A smile breaks through the hustle of the Hillcrest Farmers Market, as San Diego native T. Elizabeth Cramer stirs enamel pots filled with locally sourced vegetables—many purchased from the farms just a few stalls down. Curls of cabbage and flutters of cilantro drop from the tip of her tongs. Each day the offerings are slightly different as the rhythms of nature are embraced.

After walking the standard line of life, Elizabeth stepped away from an office job and onto a popular DC food truck to study the food business (something she strongly recommends to anyone wanting to start their own edible empire). Invaluable lessons were learned, followed by a spell of disenchantment, replaced ultimately by a deep desire to really understand farming and sourcing.

Read more at: http://ediblesandiego.ediblecommunities.com/eat/vegan-friendly-fave-tacos-hillcrest-and-north-park

Vegan Friendly: Sushi 2 Launches a Vegan Sushi Menu

The Short and Skinny

After the wild success of their “All You Can Eat (and Drink!) Vegan Sushi” nights, downtown’s Sushi 2 has put their vegan sushi on the permanent menu.

The Vibe

Crowds clamor on the sidewalk outside of Sushi 2. The dining room windows seem to allow the baroque decor of the adjacent Spreckels Theatre lobby to spill inside, so much so that you might think the crowds are here for a show. But, don’t be fooled, they’re here for the sushi.

Owner Kuniko Holmes roams the aisles of her beloved restaurant, smiling over tables filled with colorful cuts and sparkling Sapporo towers. Warm red-orange walls rise high to the paper lantern lit ceiling.

Once the downtown outlet of the Sushi Deli restaurant group, Holmes’ dedicated management won her the opportunity to buyout location, whose menu still holds memories of its past, while carving out its own niche in the market. Ever popular for riding the cusp of quality and affordability, the vegan expansion (officially debuting on 3/28) is perhaps the clearest example of her thoughtful, purposeful changes.

Read more at: Edible San Diego Vegan Friendly